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Working in Research Course offered in Repulse Bay

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Repulse Bay Arctic College students recently completed the "Working in Research" Course at the Community Learning Centre. From left to right are: Cecilia Alaralar, Anita Olayok, Lucy Tegumiar, Jimmy Kopak, Tony Ullikataq, Romeo Kopak, James Jr. Kopak, Jack Hicks, Bernadette Kopak, Gary Tinashlu, Johnny Tagaornak. Repulse Bay Arctic College students recently completed the "Working in Research" Course at the Community Learning Centre. From left to right are: Cecilia Alaralar, Anita Olayok, Lucy Tegumiar, Jimmy Kopak, Tony Ullikataq, Romeo Kopak, James Jr. Kopak, Jack Hicks, Bernadette Kopak, Gary Tinashlu, Johnny Tagaornak. Photo: Repulse Bay Community Learning Centre

Eleven residents of Repulse Bay recently completed the two week course ‘Working in Research: A Community Guide to Understanding and Participating in Research Programs’. This Nunavut Arctic College course delivery was funded by through a contribution from a research project grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and was supported by the Government of Nunavut, Department of Environment, Fisheries Division with in-kind support from Arctic College.

The delivery of the course supports the Fish-WIKS Program, a five year national research project aimed at exploring how Aboriginal and Inuit Traditional Knowledge are incorporated into Fisheries Management across Canada. Repulse Bay is one of four communities from across the country that will be involved in this research project.

What did participants learn?

Participants were directly involved in the research process. They gained the skills to help plan for two projects based on their questions:

  • Could Repulse Bay have a fish plant?
  • Why do people in Repulse Bay get cancer?

On the final day of the course each group presented their draft research plan.

Participants enjoyed learning about the research process. Their instructor, Jack Hicks, was delighted with the enthusiasm of the participants. One group held a teleconference with a medical doctor who regularly practices in the community. They asked him questions about possible causes and discussed risk factors for cancer in the community. The second group investigated the cost of fish farm equipment and interviewed key people in the community to help determine if a fish farm could be established.

Who funded this course?

The Fish-WIKS project is led by the Assembly of First Nations and Dalhousie University in partnership with the Government of Nunavut, the Unama’ki Institute of Natural Resources, the British Columbia First Nations Fisheries Council, and researchers from Vancouver Island University, University of Toronto, and University of Guelph. We thank the Department of Environment, Fisheries Division for their support in providing this Arctic College Course to the residents of Repulse Bay.

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